Monthly Archives: March 2020

Wouldn’t it be great if CBC Music/ICI Musique played all-Canadian music for two months?

Published 03/18/2020

By David Myles

Posts on the SOCAN blog Music.People.Connected. offer the opinions of the contributors only, and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of SOCAN.

I had just finished sound check, was eating dinner pre-show, when the presenter came to tell us that New Brunswick had just issued a proclamation limiting public gatherings to fewer than 150 people.

Our show was cancelled, as well as every other gig we had planned for the next couple months. I was not alone, every musician I know was in a similar situation. You could see it everywhere.

Touring is our primary source of income. Now, without that revenue stream, the other sources of income become vitally important.

I was thinking about all this, while I was reading everyone’s posts, when it hit me: what would it look like if CBC Music/ICI Musique played all-Canadian/Franco-Canadian content for the next two months? It seemed easy and direct – a simple way to make a big difference.

The infrastructure already exists for SOCAN to collect the royalties and for CBC to program the music 24 hours a day.

CBC Music/Ici Musique’s mandate is already to support Canadian/Franco-Canadian music, their job is already to be engaged with it, and their on-air personalities already love it. And 24-hour Cancon might allow them to expose listeners to Canadian music that they haven’t already heard.

This would benefit Canadian artists, across all scales of the sector. From musicians cancelling a club tour, to Jessie Reyez, who was going to open the biggest tour in the world for Billie Eilish. Imagine how heavily invested she would have been in that tour, “all in,” with all the merch that was manufactured, for example.

CBC Music/Ici Musique taking this kind of action would make a real difference in the lives of all sorts of Canadian/Franco-Canadian musicians. It’s a tremendous opportunity.

Now is the time for them, and us, to rally around our creative community.

About David Myles

Coronavirus cuts into the Canadian music industry

Published 03/13/2020

By Howard Druckman

It’s Friday the 13th, and yesterday Canada launched into its strongest, and unfortunately very necessary,  response yet to the rapidly escalating spread of Covid-19, the coronavirus. The JUNOs were cancelled, the NHL suspended play indefinitely, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau went into two weeks of self-isolation because his wife Sophie Grégoire has tested positive for the virus. Ontario shut down all public schools for two weeks after March break, MLB cancelled spring training, the Canadian Folk Music Awards were cancelled, and so on.

The JUNOS cancellation, while necessary, is especially hard for the Canadian music community to bear. The nominee musicians lost their chance, at least for now, to be nationally acknowledged for their work; some of the under-recognized performers on the broadcast awards show lost their opportunity to play on a nationally televised stage; performers in JUNOfest lost access to a broad industry audience in the bars and clubs of the host city. And that doesn’t even consider the huge losses of people who work throughout the entire ecosystem of the event — all of the employees at the airlines, hotels, bars, restaurants, taxi companies, ride-sharing programs, music venues, and so on, throughout Saskatoon.

Worse than that, gatherings of more than 250 people have either been banned or censured, with good reason, to stop the spread. For the next two weeks, this is going to hurt touring musicians playing any venues larger than that capacity. SXSW and Coachella cancelled themselves, while major concert promoters Live Nation and AEG Presents cancelled or postponed all of their tours. Many Canadian acts – from Glorious Sons to The Weeknd to Devin Townsend to Jessie Reyez (opening for Billie Eilish) – have had to postpone or cancel dates, at least through the end of March. This not only hurts the artists, but the venues, and reverberates through all of the ancillary local business ecosystems, as above.

All signs point to large numbers of Canadians staying home for the next few weeks at least, both to protect themselves and to help stop the spread of the virus. But smaller gatherings of people, so long as we  wash our hands and keep our social distance, are still viewed as safe.

So I suggest that, for the next two weeks, we – safely and carefully – go out to the small-scale music venues closest to us and support our local musicians, who are most in need of that patronage right now. In Toronto, where I happen to live, that means places like the Tranzac Club, the 120 Diner, the Cameron House, Drom Taberna, the Dakota Tavern, etc. If you’re reading this, you probably know the smaller venues you can support in your own hometown.

And if you’re not comfortable going out at all, or you’ve had to self-isolate, then I highly recommend that you click over to your favourite local band’s website or Bandcamp page and buy a T-shirt, or some limited-edition vinyl, or any other kind of merch that puts a little money in their pocket. Winnipeg musician Leonard Sumner had a great idea that he posted on Facebook – asking followers to hit him up for a Facetime concert. He might have been half-joking, but “virtual concerts” could be another way to actually help see musicians through the current crisis.

If you find yourself at home for an extended period of time, music will soothe your soul and calm your nerves. Everyone streaming and downloading their favourite stuff, all day, every day, will eventually add up to that much more in royalties for songwriters, composers and music publishers.

It’s up to you and me to support our local musicians any way we can, and help them get over the next few weeks, or months, until we can all get back to business as usual.